Linux Installation and Hardware

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Linux Installation and Hardware

Post by Rocketchess on Mon May 24, 2010 11:36 am
([msg=38981]see Linux Installation and Hardware[/msg])

First, before I pose my question, I would like to introduce myself, since this is my first post. I enjoy computers and, although I am not a genius at the keyboard, I am much more tech-savvy than most people. I am familiar with Python and can write a few programs. I have benefited from HackThisSite, which has improved my computer knowledge, and I hope to gain much more out of it.

Now for the questions:
Although this topic might be able to be in several different places, my question relates most heavily to installing Linux so I thought it appropriate to post it here. I recently uncovered an old computer of mine, on which I plan to install Linux. It currently runs Windows XP Home Edition (Version 2002), it has a 589MHz Intel Pentium II processor, 256MB of RAM, and the hard drive is 19GB. What version of Linux should I install? Should I get Xubuntu because my computer has slower hardware or should I just go for Ubuntu? What are the differences between the two? Also, I think I should get more hard drive space if I have install another OS. Are there any recommendations on where I could get a cheap hard drive? If I do get a new hard drive do both of the OS's have to be installed on the same drive? Can I just install Linux on an external hard drive. (I have a 1TB external that would be ideal to use if possible) Do you have any other recommendations? Thanks for all the help in advance.

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Re: Linux Installation and Hardware

Post by fashizzlepop on Mon May 24, 2010 12:59 pm
([msg=38984]see Re: Linux Installation and Hardware[/msg])

How to install Linux:
1, cut a hole in the box,
2, put your junk in the box,
3, make her open the box,
and that's the way you dooo it.

Of course by "cut a hole" I mean put in a Linux CD (I would suggest Arch Linux).
And by "put your junk in the box" I mean install it (if using Arch, follow the set up guide online and read the whole thing thoroughly).
And by "make her open the box" I mean start up your computer and jizz in your pants because Linux is so awesome.

When you install Linux you can make it just erase your last OS. That is what I would suggest. It is possible but probably not as easy as you'd like to install it on your TB external.

Now go do it.
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Re: Linux Installation and Hardware

Post by Rocketchess on Tue May 25, 2010 9:24 am
([msg=39042]see Re: Linux Installation and Hardware[/msg])

Thanks for the reply, but I didn't ask how to install Linux; I asked for a distribution recommendation and tips for getting a secondary hard drive or installing on an external drive. I don't want to get rid of Windows on my computer. Any other advice would be appreciated.
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Re: Linux Installation and Hardware

Post by Vulpine on Tue May 25, 2010 10:18 am
([msg=39044]see Re: Linux Installation and Hardware[/msg])

Rocketchess wrote:Thanks for the reply, but I didn't ask how to install Linux; I asked for a distribution recommendation and tips for getting a secondary hard drive or installing on an external drive. I don't want to get rid of Windows on my computer. Any other advice would be appreciated.


Linux is scalable, so just about any flavor will run well on an old machine. If you've never messed with it before, you may want to start with Ubuntu. It's simple to install, easy to use, and not bad for getting your feet wet. Since you're not willing to get rid of the current OS, you have two choices: 1. Get a second hard drive, 2. Ubuntu can be installed within Windows. Just pop the CD in with the computer booted and select the appropriate menu option.
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Re: Linux Installation and Hardware

Post by fashizzlepop on Tue May 25, 2010 11:21 pm
([msg=39085]see Re: Linux Installation and Hardware[/msg])

Google "Ubuntu Windows dual boot" or sub in whatever distro you want. I'd suggest Arch. Ubuntu is bloated. Pm me I you want help with installing Arch. Arch can also be installed alongside Windows.
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Re: Linux Installation and Hardware

Post by FunctionCreep on Wed May 26, 2010 10:50 pm
([msg=39132]see Re: Linux Installation and Hardware[/msg])

Google "Ubuntu Windows dual boot" or sub in whatever distro you want. I'd suggest Arch. Ubuntu is bloated. Pm me I you want help with installing Arch. Arch can also be installed alongside Windows.


I would suggest giving ubuntu a spin before trying anything else.

Yes it might be bloated but it's the most user friendly distro out there and apt-get is one of the best package managers aswell. There are trillions of distros available and each serves a specific purpose. Ubuntu has taken up the task of bringing new users into linux and does pretty good at that.

Also keep in mind that many distributions provide live-cd versions meaning that you can run the operating system off a CD without touching anything on your hard-drive. That gives the advantage of "previewing" what you could be installing. Keep in mind though that the speed is SIGNIFICANTLY affected when running off a cd-rom (or a usb stick etc.) than running it off your Hard-drive. The last being the fastest ofcourse.

tips for getting a secondary hard drive or installing on an external drive.


I would suggest avoiding anything that connects to a usb port since from my experience the data transfer speeds are way too slow to make it worthwile. My number 1 choice would be a second internal hard-drive they're cheap and they're fast.
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Re: Linux Installation and Hardware

Post by fashizzlepop on Wed May 26, 2010 11:23 pm
([msg=39133]see Re: Linux Installation and Hardware[/msg])

I guess Ubuntu is alright. I suppose I am more of a purist. You would learn more about Linux by going the Arch route for sure though.
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