Scheme

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Scheme

Post by yourmysin on Mon Mar 09, 2009 9:38 pm
([msg=19706]see Scheme[/msg])

Scheme is an interpreted programming language which satisfies the functional paradigm. I first learned about scheme in an introduction to programming class. Scheme is a dialect of Lisp, which is much more common.

I personally did not like the language and was curious if anyone else had experience with the language.
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Re: Scheme

Post by Defience on Wed Mar 11, 2009 9:30 am
([msg=19805]see Re: Scheme[/msg])

yourmysin wrote:Scheme is an interpreted programming language which satisfies the functional paradigm. I first learned about scheme in an introduction to programming class. Scheme is a dialect of Lisp, which is much more common.

I personally did not like the language and was curious if anyone else had experience with the language.


Wow....it's apparently been around for a long time but I've never heard of it until now:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scheme_pro ... g_language

At a glance, I don't care for it either.
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Re: Scheme

Post by damage_case on Wed Mar 18, 2009 3:59 am
([msg=20125]see Re: Scheme[/msg])

I've had to learn it for the university course.
At first it seemed to be very annoying after procedural and OO languages. Then it seemed to be still annoying but i got used to it :)
Nevertheless I didn't like Scheme at all and never used it after the course was over.
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Re: Scheme

Post by tgoe on Tue Mar 24, 2009 10:25 pm
([msg=20493]see Re: Scheme[/msg])

My first impression was "Holy Parentheses, Batman!"
But I found an interesting article that argues its advantages: http://www.paulgraham.com/icad.html
For a language that has been around since the 50's, I guess it's pretty impressive to still be relevant.
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Re: Scheme

Post by nathandelane on Wed Mar 25, 2009 8:26 pm
([msg=20548]see Re: Scheme[/msg])

Scheme is a great language for learning, but it is also a practical programming language. Like C it does not supply any output functions in the standard form. But it also emulates a Turing machine in software. I think the parentheses are nice because they help maintain a distinct order of operations. It is also showcases lambda notation (not certain whether that is the correct terminology), which has to do with the parentheses also. MIT/GNU Scheme is probably the most common open source Scheme implementation. Another factor that sets scheme apart which is related is that functions are written in Polish Postfix Notation rather than infix notation. For example, instead of (1 + 2), you would write (+ 1 2), and instead of x = 1, you would write (define x 1). Polish Postfix notation goes like (function left right) or (operator left right).

Scheme has often been used as an ancillary scripting language in systems. One example is The GIMP, which allows extensions to be written in a variant of Scheme they call Script-Fu, which works closely with the GIMP API. Scheme is useful as a scientific tool in my opinion as well, just as C or C++ are.

There is a lot more to Scheme, but there you have it.

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