tutorials, history, bash and other good resources

A place where newbies can post without (much) fear of reprisal. All mission posts should still go in the applicable forum.
Forum rules
Older HTS users: Be nice to the new people.

NEW USERS: This is NOT the place to post about missions! Refer to "Missions" category.

tutorials, history, bash and other good resources

Post by maxyp on Mon Oct 22, 2012 1:04 pm
([msg=70300]see tutorials, history, bash and other good resources[/msg])

This is basically your average noob's: where to start Q&A first post.

except I kinda know where to start and what to learn.

Start at https://www.google.com/ http://www.w3schools.com/ and http://www.youtube.com
google your questions
learn the tutorials for html, php, js and another language of your choice: (java, perl, python, C something, or ruby etc.)
watch how to videos for everything

What I would love to find would be a site, list of resources, some bored person etc. to explain the ins and outs of the myriad of languages, tools, exploits, lingo, history, and their personal experience using them.
The big ones here are history and personal experience. It seems to me that a good 60% of computer software has its source code origin in UNIX which was originally released around 1970. 40 years ago. BSD vs System V
or security specific, the different flavors of BSD: open, free, net, dragonfly to name a few...
(how many of us noobs know the difference between openBSD and freeBSD? I had to look it up going into writing this, just to make sure. For those who dont know: openBSD is what The Lord My God uses and freeBSD is what steve jobs uses...)


I dont think you can really become a computer security expert without first understand the history behind the internet and IT security.

In conclusion:
My newbie question of the day to all you HTS oldtimers is this: Know any good resources for explaining these things, especially where they came from originally? Along with: Got any helpful or good stories from your experiances during the good ol' days? Finished by: Which IRC should I jump onto?


thanks,
maxyp

PS: any good computer history related or commandline/bash tutorials and related advice/know how would also be helpful.

PPS: While im new to the scene, I did do some research, just so I would sound more knowledgeable than I really am. I got stuck on basic mission three for google's sake!!
Last edited by maxyp on Mon Oct 22, 2012 5:41 pm, edited 2 times in total.
|_|0|_|
|_|_|0|
|0|0|0|

The definitive work on the subject: http://www.catb.org/esr/faqs/hacker-howto.html
maxyp
New User
New User
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Oct 22, 2012 10:57 am
Blog: View Blog (0)


Re: tutorials, history, bash and other good resources

Post by centip3de on Mon Oct 22, 2012 3:47 pm
([msg=70307]see Re: tutorials, history, bash and other good resources[/msg])

maxyp wrote:This is basically your average noob's: where to start Q&A first post.

except I kinda know where to start and what to learn.

Start at https://www.google.com/ http://www.w3schools.com/ and http://www.youtube.com
google your questions
learn the tutorials for html, php, js and another language of your choice: (java, perl, C something, or ruby etc.)
watch how to videos for everything


You know, there are a lot more resources than just videos. In fact, the way I learn 99% of the time is to mess around with something for weeks, until I know it backwards, forwards, and sideways.

maxyp wrote:What I would love to find would be a site, list of resources, some bored person etc. to explain the ins and outs of the myriad of languages, tools, exploits, lingo, history, and their personal experience using them.


There is one already, Wikipedia.

maxyp wrote:The big ones here are history and personal experience. It seems to me that a good 60% of computer software has its source code origin in UNIX which was originally released around 1970. 40 years ago.


Well, yes. Many of them originated in classic Unix/Linux, however, almost all of the ones that did originate back then (if they're still around) have changed to such an extent, it's almost useless learning the old version of it. (Unless you're doing OS/Compiler/Networking design, then you NEED to look back)

maxyp wrote:BSD vs System V
or security specific, the different flavors of BSD: open, free, net, dragonfly to name a few...
(how many of us noobs know the difference between openBSD and freeBSD? I had to look it up going into writing this, just to make sure. For those who dont know: openBSD is what The Lord My God uses and freeBSD is what steve jobs uses...)


BSD isn't as widely used in the hacking world as the *nix's are, I'd suggest researching those first, then researching more on BSD.

maxyp wrote:I dont think you can really become a computer security expert without first understand the history behind the internet and IT security.


To a degree. You don't have to know that the Internet originated with ARPNet (or something similar) in order to be an expert in computer security, hell, you don't even need to know that Bill Gates helped Steve Woz and Steve Jobs complete their OS (and they returned the favor). You should however, read up on exploits in the past, as it helps you realize how many vulnerabilities there truly are, and how important computer security is. However, that's really the only reason to research the history on computer security. You will not get any insider information into the world of computer security by doing a massive history report on it.

maxyp wrote:In conclusion:
My newbie question of the day to all you HTSfag's (read: HTS oldtimers) No. is this: Know any good resources for explaining these things, especially where they came from originally? Along with: Got any helpful or good stories from your experiances during the good ol' days? Finished by: Which IRC should I jump onto?

Wikipedia, Wikipedia, and the front page of HTS should have that information on it.

maxyp wrote:PS: any good computer history related or commandline/bash tutorials and related advice/know how would also be helpful.


Wikipedia and the man pages should help you here.
Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better idiot-proof programs, and the Universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the Universe is winning. -Rick Cook
User avatar
centip3de
Moderator
Moderator
 
Posts: 1409
Joined: Fri Aug 20, 2010 5:46 pm
Blog: View Blog (0)


Re: tutorials, history, bash and other good resources

Post by maxyp on Mon Oct 22, 2012 4:59 pm
([msg=70309]see Re: tutorials, history, bash and other good resources[/msg])

Here are some useful links ive found during my search for useful links...

For you oldtimers, a resouces that helps you get the point across, while being nice to the new people... (sarcasm is such a powerful teaching aid use it)
http://lmgtfy.com/

for you newbies!!
http://bit.ly/UtJ97T

as many others have said, the ultimate resource:
https://www.google.com/

A must have for those new to linux, (you probably want i386):
http://releases.ubuntu.com/precise/

IMHO A virtual machine is a must have as you enter into the field of computer security, it makes it easy and safe to mess around with different operating systems and command line. There are multiple options out there, VMware being my personal favorite. But I say support open source software, so here is the link to virtual box.
https://www.virtualbox.org/

when it comes to anonymity, no one does it better than tor and tails (IMHO correct me if im wrong):
https://www.torproject.org/
https://tails.boum.org/

Debian, the universal OS... A.K.A. ITs been 12 hours, how the f******* do I get my internet to work!

Because the debian source is entirely open, no freeware, propriety, share, anything (if I am not mistaken)... the original set-up lacks some drivers popular with most hardware. Most notably wifi chipsets
Yeah, debian is kinda a pain when you are new to linux, get ubuntu first, its pretty stupid proof. But once you are familiar with ubuntu (read: linux) upgrade to debian, practically every operating system you will ever use that isnt mac or win will be based off of debian or share many of the same features.
http://www.debian.org/security/

Other links:
http://cb.vu/unixtoolbox.xhtml
http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2010/08/bas ... -commands/
http://lifehacker.com/evil-week/
http://ecommerce.hostip.info/pages/252/ ... urity.html
http://www.darknet.org.uk/2006/03/10-be ... -recovery/
http://www.cyberciti.biz/tips/linux-uni ... heets.html
http://www.tldp.org/LDP/Bash-Beginners- ... -Guide.pdf

maxyp

PS: now to actually read all the stuff I dredged up...

-- Mon Oct 22, 2012 4:34 pm --

centip3de wrote:
You know, there are a lot more resources than just videos. In fact, the way I learn 99% of the time is to mess around with something for weeks, until I know it backwards, forwards, and sideways.


A requirement of messing around with something is knowing enough about it so that you can mess around with it. Ive been on computers all my life (albit not using them properly) and it wasnt till about 6 months ago, while reading about early computers that I even knew that bash/terminal existed and that I had it on my computer and where to find it. when I first started using bash, my first thoughts were. This should have been the first thing I learned when my dad logged me on to a computer for the first time. Not the last thing I learn, and that even after spending years surfing the internet. SO, most people coming here for the first time are completely ignorent of the basics you would need to know in order to decide on what messing around with.

centip3de wrote:
Well, yes. Many of them originated in classic Unix/Linux, however, almost all of the ones that did originate back then (if they're still around) have changed to such an extent, it's almost useless learning the old version of it. (Unless you're doing OS/Compiler/Networking design, then you NEED to look back)




centip3de wrote:
BSD isn't as widely used in the hacking world as the *nix's are, I'd suggest researching those first, then researching more on BSD.


Im not talking specifically about just hacking, but security in general, which is what this site claims to be about. openBSD is secure out of the box. Yeah, it isnt important to have the entire source code memorized, but knowing why it is secure and what changes you can make to it that result in it not being secure is important. that knowledge will easily transfer to understanding how to make your own system (linux/osx/win) more secure, or penetrating someone elses system. Many of the same principals apply.

centip3de wrote:
To a degree. You don't have to know that the Internet originated with ARPNet (or something similar) in order to be an expert in computer security, hell, you don't even need to know that Bill Gates helped Steve Woz and Steve Jobs complete their OS (and they returned the favor). You should however, read up on exploits in the past, as it helps you realize how many vulnerabilities there truly are, and how important computer security is. However, that's really the only reason to research the history on computer security. You will not get any insider information into the world of computer security by doing a massive history report on it.


I agree learning to hack should not be a history class, but so much of whats going on right now at the cutting edge started 20+ years ago. If you are looking to become part of the hacking/security community you cant start at the cutting edge. Begin with the basics, and that all started year ago.

Get where im coming from?
|_|0|_|
|_|_|0|
|0|0|0|

The definitive work on the subject: http://www.catb.org/esr/faqs/hacker-howto.html
maxyp
New User
New User
 
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Oct 22, 2012 10:57 am
Blog: View Blog (0)



Return to NZone

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests