WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage

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WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage

Post by Irish Clov3r on Mon Jan 28, 2013 2:58 pm
([msg=72781]see WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage[/msg])

Whats the difference between web language and software language. I understand that they have many difference but when i went to decide on the languages i wanted to learn because I'm new to all of this. I couldn't figure which language was for what. Like is PHP a web based language or is it for software.

*moved*
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Re: WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage

Post by Drizna on Mon Jan 28, 2013 4:32 pm
([msg=72793]see Re: WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage[/msg])

This will be better answered in the Programming section of the forum.
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Re: WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage

Post by -Ninjex- on Mon Jan 28, 2013 4:43 pm
([msg=72795]see Re: WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage[/msg])

Irish Clov3r wrote:Whats the difference between web language and software language. I understand that they have many difference but when i went to decide on the languages i wanted to learn because I'm new to all of this. I couldn't figure which language was for what. Like is PHP a web based language or is it for software.


I made this post a while back, you might be interested in it:

LINK!
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Re: WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage

Post by WallShadow on Mon Jan 28, 2013 4:49 pm
([msg=72796]see Re: WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage[/msg])

Irish Clov3r wrote:Whats the difference between web language and software language. I understand that they have many difference but when i went to decide on the languages i wanted to learn because I'm new to all of this. I couldn't figure which language was for what. Like is PHP a web based language or is it for software.


I have no clue what you're talking about. As far as i know, there are no 'web languages' and 'software languages'. I've heard of low level, high level, web-oriented, compiled, run-time execution, just-in-time compiled, static binding, dynamic binding, object-oriented, event-oriented, functional, linear, database, and esoteric languages... but i have never heard of 'web languages' or 'software languages'.

Any language that you code and compile to run on a processor is software. Any language designed for web development is a web-oriented language.
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Re: WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage

Post by centip3de on Mon Jan 28, 2013 4:55 pm
([msg=72797]see Re: WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage[/msg])

Irish Clov3r wrote:Whats the difference between web language and software language. I understand that they have many difference but when i went to decide on the languages i wanted to learn because I'm new to all of this. I couldn't figure which language was for what. Like is PHP a web based language or is it for software.


This probably should have been asked in the Programming section of the forum, but whatever, it's here, it works.

@OP: You can think of each programming language as an actual human language in order to understand them a bit better. Each one has it's own purpose and was designed for a certain reason. While they were all designed to enable communication, languages such as written English, spoken English, and American Sign Language all have different purposes. Written English was invented to record historical events and to preserve the cultures and traditions of societies. Whereas spoken English was invented in order to facilitate communication to those who could both speak and hear. However, ASL was invented to facilitate communication to those who couldn't hear, or speak. While they are all semi-interchangeable (i.e. you can communicate only in written English, even if you can hear and speak, or you can try to learn spoken English even if you can't hear) it generally is much more difficult than communicating in a different form.

The same logic can be applied to programming languages in that each was invented for a specific purpose. While you can do anything in any programming language, it generally becomes much more difficult to do rather than doing it in the intended language. If we put each programming languages into their own categories, the two main categories would be those that are used to program things on the Internet/Server side of things, and those that aren't. Languages that are used to program on the Internet/Server side of things are generally those that make up websites (HTML/CSS/XHTML/Javascript/PHP/Flash (kinda)) such as Facebook, Reddit, or even HTS. Languages that aren't (usually) used to program webpages or servers are called a variety of things such as local languages, software languages, computer languages (kinda), and quite a bit more. These languages are the ones that make up all the applications on your computer right now (C/C++/C--/C#/D/F/R/Python/Perl/Java/Visual Basic/Fortran/NASM/FASM/GAS), such as your operating system, video games, or the web browser you're using to view this web page.

To sum that all up:
Web languages - Those that are used to program and code websites
Software languages - Those that are used for programming all applications that are on your computer right now (games, operating systems, command lines, paint programs, etc.).

However, they are all quasi-interchangeable, but it makes the whole thing a lot more difficult.

-- Mon Jan 28, 2013 1:58 pm --

WallShadow wrote:I have no clue what you're talking about. As far as i know, there are no 'web languages' and 'software languages'. I've heard of low level, high level, web-oriented, compiled, run-time execution, just-in-time compiled, static binding, dynamic binding, object-oriented, event-oriented, functional, linear, database, and esoteric languages... but i have never heard of 'web languages' or 'software languages'.

Any language that you code and compile to run on a processor is software. Any language designed for web development is a web-oriented language.


There are plenty of "web languages" or "software languages", however they're most commonly referred to whatever sub-category the belong to, such as the ones you listed. Also, hate to be that guy but web-oriented languages also run on processors (in the same sense you defined a "software language" to be).
Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better idiot-proof programs, and the Universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the Universe is winning. -Rick Cook
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Re: WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage

Post by WallShadow on Mon Jan 28, 2013 5:17 pm
([msg=72798]see Re: WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage[/msg])

centip3de wrote:Also, hate to be that guy but web-oriented languages also run on processors (in the same sense you defined a "software language" to be).


I never stated other-wise. Web-oriented languages are also software, i agree.
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Re: WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage

Post by centip3de on Mon Jan 28, 2013 5:50 pm
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WallShadow wrote:I never stated other-wise. Web-oriented languages are also software, i agree.


Yes, but you defined a "software language" as one that is executed on the processor. Unless they're the same thing (which for OP's sake, let's pretend that they're not) then they shouldn't have the same definition, no?
Programming today is a race between software engineers striving to build bigger and better idiot-proof programs, and the Universe trying to produce bigger and better idiots. So far, the Universe is winning. -Rick Cook
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Re: WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage

Post by WallShadow on Tue Jan 29, 2013 12:57 am
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centip3de wrote:Yes, but you defined a "software language" as one that is executed on the processor. Unless they're the same thing (which for OP's sake, let's pretend that they're not) then they shouldn't have the same definition, no?


What I'm saying is that 'software languages' encompass web-oriented languages in them (unless there are some hardware-level web-oriented languages in which case correct me), but web-oriented languages do no encompass all of software by any means. Perhaps it is the OP who has the wrong idea of what he is talking about? Or perhaps we define the term web-oriented language poorly, any local-side web-oriented language is usually a text-formating and/or script language while server-side web-oriented language is usually a scripting language. Although they are designed for use across the internet, I've seen cases where web-oriented languages are used purely locally, no web involved.
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Re: WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage

Post by Irish Clov3r on Tue Jan 29, 2013 10:00 am
([msg=72889]see Re: WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage[/msg])

Thank you guys for all taking the time to respond i know it should of been in programming because of the ? but I'm new. I haven't figured out where everything is so far but i really appreciate you going ahead to answer it.
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Re: WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage

Post by KthProg on Sat Feb 02, 2013 2:45 pm
([msg=73260]see Re: WebLanguage and SoftwareLanguage[/msg])

This is highly opinion based but
IMO web languages are much more complicated and often more scripting-style languages.
usually web languages are verbose and difficult to read despite doing the same thing as a software language expect over a TCP/IP connection.
I don't know why this is, I think it's because the web changes so fast that web language developers don't have the time to pretty up the syntax, they just need it to run.
oftentimes things you would think are simple are very complicated in web languages, like connecting to an XML file.

software languages, for whatever reason, usually have a much clearer syntax, are much less verbose, and are much less diverse.

oddly enough, youll likely get paid more to develop software, despite how difficult web programming is (relatively)

btw, this is all seriously biased opinion lol

and centipede, VB.NET and C# are very commonly used for web pages (through the ASP.Net framework)
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