I want to learn programming HELP!

Discuss how to write good code, break bad code, your current pet projects, or the best way to approach novel problems

Re: I want to learn programming HELP!

Post by ghostheadx2 on Mon Jun 29, 2015 11:03 pm
([msg=88730]see Re: I want to learn programming HELP![/msg])

Do code academy and do python or ruby if you want to teach yourself or Learn Python the Hard Way is a fantastic book also. If you want to take a class, then go to a community college or if your in college than take a class at whatever college your at. I guess classes at a university are better then community, but you'll probably be learning C++ or Java, which are both good languages. I think Python or Ruby are best for beginners so teach yourself that if you want.

The other good one for a beginner to teach himself is HTML, CSS, JavaScript, PHP, etc., which is about as complex as knowing one language if you just know the basics of how to make a website. :D
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Re: I want to learn programming HELP!

Post by PortFondler on Fri Nov 13, 2015 3:27 pm
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2 places that have always worked best for me (note: I am still a beginner with coding/hacking in general)




Codecademy (for python, SQL, javascript, html/css, java, linux command line)

                +

MIT (has a website & somewhere in there you can access videos of all kinds of lectures, I'm sure C and other more complex/compiled languages are there)
..."Learn from people. Teach people. Do anything that will satiate your need to learn and keep you out of a cell at the same time.

The world is so much bigger than some person's inbox" ~Goatboy
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Re: I want to learn programming HELP!

Post by Jbraithwaite on Mon Nov 16, 2015 10:38 am
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Learning a language from scratch is hard because anything past Hello World is simply impossible if you don't have knowledge of what that language can do for you. Everyone wants to learn code but most of the time they root about tutorials and videos looking for things to write.

One thing I find frustrating when learning a new language is where to go after Hello World. Copying peoples code is one thing but learning what to do with your own is another problem. I went to college to learn VB6 and it was amazing to be instructor led. I taught myself how to do Java for Android and wrote 3 apps for friends. The New Boston on Youtube is good for tuts on that btw.

You need to know what you want to do with the language but I found it hard to find that out. It's a lot like opening photoshop and not really knowing what you want to do with an image. There's loads of ways to do the same job.
In training....
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Re: I want to learn programming HELP!

Post by 000000ffffff on Fri Apr 14, 2017 7:39 pm
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IMO the best language to start with is C. As you learn C, you can start adding in some C++ so you can see why C++ was developed. You'll know you've reached a good level once you've learned to appreciate C++ object-oriented features and can then go back to C and implement them the way it used to be done before C++ really took over.

I see a lot of people start with Java, Python, or Javascript and I think that's a mistake.

Java looks like C++ but it's not even close. It has a garbage-collector, there are no pointers, and all functions are virtual. What's more, "an interface" in Java, is called an abstract class with pure virtual functions in C++. I know all those polymorphic terms might make a beginner shake in their boots, but the solution isn't to hide behind a language that hides the stuff for you. If you start from the bottom you'll implement features as you learn them, and soon enough you won't be scared of the words 'static', 'virtual', or 'abstract'.

Python is even worse at this. It's not even statically-typed, which means you "don't have to worry about declaring variable type". Nevermind the inherent laziness (imo), this makes the language much slower. In a function call, the interpreter has to do a pointer lookup for both the variable type and the function call, call the function itself, pass the arguments, extract the internal data from the arguments (they might be user-defined data types) which requires more pointer lookups, perform the operation, place the result inside a new object, then return the result. It's not just hype. Dynamic typing is slow for a reason, and the convenience does not outweigh the performance loss.

I honestly don't have too much experience with Javascript, so I don't have much to say about it, other than it's another interpreted language, albeit a very useful one. Not that Java and Python aren't useful; on the contrary, but like I said, starting from the bottom and working your way up is the only way to truly master your craft.

Edit: when I say that it's bad Java has a garbage collector and functions are virtual, I meant that it's bad because not only do beginners not know they're virtual, they don't even know what that means. That's the problem. Java is too polymorphic.

It's also pretty wordy. I think any beginner prefers "int main" to "public static void main." The problem with learning a pure-Object Oriented programming language when you have no semblance of object-oriented programming (or objects), is everything.
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