Testcase WiFi signal Interference

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Testcase WiFi signal Interference

Post by M00rlicious on Thu Feb 27, 2014 7:14 am
([msg=79671]see Testcase WiFi signal Interference[/msg])

Dear HTS members,

I have this problem which I can't figure out.
We have this neighbourhood where everyone has offcourse a router of some sort and everyone is sending out mostly a 2,4 gHz signal. The problem in this is that everyone has interference on their WiFi signal. The newer modem-routers our company is deploying right now switches between Canal 1, 6 and 11 if it senses interference. We on our own department get allot of calls with people still having interference and their wifi signal being disturbed every once in a while on a daily basis.

What can I/we do speaking on a software basis?

Thanks for your help,

Burak
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Re: Testcase WiFi signal Interference

Post by Tentra on Thu Feb 27, 2014 6:09 pm
([msg=79676]see Re: Testcase WiFi signal Interference[/msg])

I think first off, you need to decide if there is actually any interference at all. Customers will bitch about everything, how are you sure that 2.4GHz interference is the problem?

Once you are sure there is interference causing service disruptions for the routers, consider all possible sources of interference. The 2.4GHz band is flooded with noise, microwaves, cordless phones, video cameras, and tons of common household electronics can interfere with a 2.4GHz router. Even if you had multiple routers on the same 2.4GHz channel, they should work cooperatively rather than obstruct each other, by design of 802.11.

I know there are devices that can pick up all 2.4GHz traffic to help find sources of interference; I have never used one though. Aside from switching to the 5GHz band, some type of scanner to find the source of the interference seems to be the only option.

However, I would like to reiterate that there is a really good chance that interference is not the issue but rather customers jumping to conclusions that they found on the internet.
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Re: Testcase WiFi signal Interference

Post by M00rlicious on Thu Feb 27, 2014 6:42 pm
([msg=79677]see Re: Testcase WiFi signal Interference[/msg])

You are right in certain cases, but we have our own tools that tell us there is some real interference caused by "whatever."

Can't a wifi signal be "protected" just as CAT6 and/or CAT7 are protected with sstp?
(Maybe i 'm saying something very stupid/impossible right now, just wondered?)
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Re: Testcase WiFi signal Interference

Post by limdis on Thu Feb 27, 2014 7:05 pm
([msg=79678]see Re: Testcase WiFi signal Interference[/msg])

Alright let's get this frequency thing out of the way first.

Your Channels:
Ch1 - 2.412 GHz
Ch6 - 2.437 GHz
Ch11 - 2.462 GHz

USA – Uses channels 1 to 11 (2.412 GHz – 2.462 GHz)
Europe – Uses channels 1 to 13 (2.412 GHz – 2.472 GHz)
Japan – Uses channels 1 to 14 (2.412 GHz – 2.484 GHz)

Now depending on which protocal and frequency your routers are using (for each channel) it can cause different problems depending on your setup. What I mean is below:

802.11 – The original WLAN standard
802.11a – Up to 54 Mbit/s on 5 GHz
802.11b – 5.5 Mbit/s and 11 Mbit/s on 2.4 GHz
802.11g – Up to 54 Mbit/s on 2.4 GHz. Backward compatible with 802.11b
802.11i – Provides enhanced security
802.11n – Provides higher throughput with Multiple Input/Multiple Output (MIMO)

Assuming these routers have been setup by professionals who understand the complications and differences between antenna types, channel width, walls, and interference vs collisions; then your next step is to check for packet losses between channel hops and how often they hop. This includes device transfers to other routers while in motion. It could simply be a matter of your settings being far too sensitive and get stuck in violent hopping loops (for a period of time). Afterwards I would exam packet captures from assosication traffic. Are there are plethora of deauths? Are associations not being directed at the right receiver, etc.

How is your network setup? Encryption types, student vs staff seperated channels (for example), etc.?
You really haven't given us much to work with to really assist you here. I could really go on for a long time about possibilities :|

To answer your last question, no. It doesn't work like that. These signals are not being isolated and thus a lot of interferences may occur.
"The quieter you become, the more you are able to hear..."
"Drink all the booze, hack all the things."
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