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Linux defrag and antivirus

PostPosted: Sun Sep 04, 2011 3:44 am
by LoGiCaL__
Let me start off by saying linux is definitely worth learning and using. That being said, I notice people that are new to linux (as was I once) try to mimic to the tee what they would do on windows. Hence, defragmenting and antivirus. There are probably more you can think of but these two stick out. Below are two sites I found informative as to reasons why defragmenting and viruses on linux aren't as big of a priority as they are on windows. Happy reasearching :idea:

http://geekblog.oneandoneis2.org/index.php/2006/08/17/why_doesn_t_linux_need_defragmenting

http://www.daniweb.com/hardware-and-software/linux-and-unix/getting-started-and-choosing-a-distro/threads/41955

Re: Linux defrag and antivirus

PostPosted: Tue Sep 20, 2011 2:25 pm
by tremor77
Malware can still be an issue and depending on what browser you are using, some browser-jacking software can also be problematic at times... I think as you see OS like Ubuntu gaining popularity among general users as alternative to high priced OS, especially in these economic times... you'll also see more targetting of malware and virus toward them in the future.

Re: Linux defrag and antivirus

PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 11:52 pm
by archolman
You do have to work at installing malware on *Nix-type OS'. In general, just clicking on, say, a rogue anti-virus check won't install the hidden malware, as the process is not automatic, but has to be managed by the system admin, (that's you). In that respect, it's a lot more secure than Window$.
Browser security is another matter. I run NoScript in my Firefox install, which, used properly, helps prevent browser abuse. However, the first line of defence is YOU. And the biggest security hole is YOUR ON-LINE BEHAVIOUR.


Defragging/compacting the HDD under GNU/Linux.
As GNU/Linux uses the "Ext3" & Ext4" file-system, it keeps itself defragged. However, regularly compacting & de-crufting the drive is good practice.
On the boot screen, there are 2 Linux kernels to choose from. Choose the "recovery" option, & then select "Make space" (It's called that, or something similar). This will do just that. Reboot.

(The following is for Debian-based distros, e.g.Ubuntu. Other distros will have a different method of running as Admin, or Super User, probably by prefixing the command with "su".
For further de-crufting, open a terminal, & copy & paste this string:
Code: Select all
sudo apt-get autoremove && sudo apt-get autoclean && sudo apt-get clean

Press "Enter". It will ask for the sudo (admin) password.
Type it in & press "Enter".

I also use an app called Bleachbit, which should be in the repository of your flavour of GNU/Linux a GUI-based tool for removing even more cruft, such as rotated logs, various caches, unwanted language files, etc, etc. BE CAREFUL WHEN SELECTING THE ACTIONS YOU WANT IT TO DO. READ & CHECK THE LIST CAREFULLY.
Click on an item in the list for further details before ticking the box.

An expansion of the simple script above will upgrade your system, clean up, & run bleachbit:
Code: Select all
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade && sudo apt-get autoremove && sudo apt-get autoclean && sudo apt-get clean && sudo bleachbit && exit

When using this script, wait till Bleachbit has finished, then press "Alt + F4". This closes both windows.
(I run this script weekly)

Re: Linux defrag and antivirus

PostPosted: Sat May 19, 2012 8:30 pm
by centip3de
archolman wrote:You do have to work at installing malware on *Nix-type OS'. In general, just clicking on, say, a rogue anti-virus check won't install the hidden malware, as the process is not automatic, but has to be managed by the system admin, (that's you). In that respect, it's a lot more secure than Window$.
Browser security is another matter. I run NoScript in my Firefox install, which, used properly, helps prevent browser abuse. However, the first line of defence is YOU. And the biggest security hole is YOUR ON-LINE BEHAVIOUR.


Defragging/compacting the HDD under GNU/Linux.
As GNU/Linux uses the "Ext3" & Ext4" file-system, it keeps itself defragged. However, regularly compacting & de-crufting the drive is good practice.
On the boot screen, there are 2 Linux kernels to choose from. Choose the "recovery" option, & then select "Make space" (It's called that, or something similar). This will do just that. Reboot.

(The following is for Debian-based distros, e.g.Ubuntu. Other distros will have a different method of running as Admin, or Super User, probably by prefixing the command with "su".
For further de-crufting, open a terminal, & copy & paste this string:
Code: Select all
sudo apt-get autoremove && sudo apt-get autoclean && sudo apt-get clean

Press "Enter". It will ask for the sudo (admin) password.
Type it in & press "Enter".

I also use an app called Bleachbit, which should be in the repository of your flavour of GNU/Linux a GUI-based tool for removing even more cruft, such as rotated logs, various caches, unwanted language files, etc, etc. BE CAREFUL WHEN SELECTING THE ACTIONS YOU WANT IT TO DO. READ & CHECK THE LIST CAREFULLY.
Click on an item in the list for further details before ticking the box.

An expansion of the simple script above will upgrade your system, clean up, & run bleachbit:
Code: Select all
sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade && sudo apt-get autoremove && sudo apt-get autoclean && sudo apt-get clean && sudo bleachbit && exit

When using this script, wait till Bleachbit has finished, then press "Alt + F4". This closes both windows.
(I run this script weekly)


+1 for the post, great quality.
-1 for the necro, this thread is dead.