Taking the Leap

Discuss the security implications of the various flavors of linux and unix

Taking the Leap

Post by LearNtoLearN on Thu Aug 26, 2010 9:20 pm
([msg=44395]see Taking the Leap[/msg])

Hey Guys! I've decided that it's far beyond time to take the leap and install and learn to run a Linux based OS. This being said I have no idea where to start. The purpose of this post is to get some thoughts on which Linux distribution you guys use and/or would recommend. Also, I'd be running it on a new desktop build so I'm not sure if there would be compatibility issues.

Here are the specs for it:
Intel Core i7-930 CPU
Gigabyte X58A-UD3R
6gb (3x2gb) 240-pin OCZ High Performance RAM
CoolerMaster SilentProM 850 Watt PSU
Sapphire ATI Radeon HD 5850 GPU
Antec 1200 Case
Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit OS

Any input would be greatly appreciated!
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Re: Taking the Leap

Post by Draymire on Thu Aug 26, 2010 10:44 pm
([msg=44397]see Re: Taking the Leap[/msg])

lol that looks a lot like my computer.
Try ubuntu it is most recommended for new users due to a shallow learning curve (compared to others). It has a nice GUI so that you don't have to worry about what goes on underneath until you really wish to learn. then you can just pick something and learn how to do it.

I would recommend getting virtual box or something similar and installing it in there so that you can play with it as much as you want and not worry about nuking your system. I have done that a few times.
Or you could just backup all your data like it should be anyways.
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Re: Taking the Leap

Post by mRmasteRful on Fri Aug 27, 2010 1:34 am
([msg=44404]see Re: Taking the Leap[/msg])

Ive tried Ubuntu and some other distro. Ubuntu for the win. I don't have much linux experience but I thought it was wasy enough and it doesnt get to complicated when you trying to do simple tasks.
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Re: Taking the Leap

Post by LearNtoLearN on Fri Aug 27, 2010 11:02 am
([msg=44432]see Re: Taking the Leap[/msg])

Thanks for the responses guys! I have heard that Ubuntu is an easy Linux to learn how to run, however I was hoping to learn how to run one that makes me learn how to do more of "what goes on underneath". Would using a separate hard drive (i have an old 40 gb one lying around) prevent any worries about "nuking" my system?
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Re: Taking the Leap

Post by RabbitH0le on Fri Aug 27, 2010 11:11 am
([msg=44434]see Re: Taking the Leap[/msg])

You could boot from a separate hard drive, but there is really no point to do so immediately. Like the other guys said, you can use a virtual machine at first so that you don't need to get rid of Windows completely until you know a little more about how the new OS operates. Additionally, several distros (including Ubuntu) offer Live CD's which lets you run the OS directly from a cd. You can download an .iso of the cd and run it right from your desktop, so you don't need to wait for it to be shipped to your house.

Ubuntu is probably the best choice for a beginner, imo. It has a GUI pretty similar to a MAC OS, but it also offers the classic linux shell if you choose to start learning the inner workings.

Hope this helps.
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Re: Taking the Leap

Post by fashizzlepop on Fri Aug 27, 2010 12:52 pm
([msg=44438]see Re: Taking the Leap[/msg])

I would highly suggest NOT going with Ubuntu especially since you said you wish to learn more in depth about the workings going on.

What I would suggest and what I did myself was:
1. Download Arch Linux and burn to a CD.
2. Grab a laptop or internet capable cell phone and go to the Arch Linux WIki and then the Beginner's guide/ install guide.
2. Boot from CD and start up Arch.
3. You will be given a bash prompt.
4. type "/arch/setup" and follow the guide to help you fully install arch.
5. From there go ahead and get everything configured right, like wireless etc., then try and install KDE.

The install/beginner's guide will be your bible. I highly suggest wiping Windows because that will FORCE you to use linux and that will make you learn your stuff.

Email me if you have any questions.
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