Possible gateway problem

Data that travels over the air and how to protect (or decipher) it

Possible gateway problem

Post by Phantom Wolf on Tue Feb 01, 2011 3:34 am
([msg=53073]see Possible gateway problem[/msg])

I'm hoping someone here can help me solve a networking problem.

I have two networks in my home, 192.168.0.0/24 and 192.168.1.0/24. The 192.168.0 network has a mobile broadband router running NAT, the 192.168.1 network has nothing. I'd like for computers in both networks to be able to talk to eachother, and I'd like for computers in the 192.168.1 network to be able to access the Internet. I "revived" an old laptop and connected it to both networks so it can act as a gateway, enabled packet forwarding, and set up routes. Its current routing table looks like this:
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Kernel IP routing table
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags Metric Ref    Use Iface
192.168.1.0     *               255.255.255.0   U     0      0      0   eth1
192.168.0.0     *               255.255.255.0   U     0      0      0   eth0
loopback        *               255.0.0.0       U     0      0      0   lo
default         192.168.0.1     0.0.0.0         UG    0      0      0   eth1

This computers IPs are 192.168.1.2 and 192.168.0.2, and the mobile broadband router's IP is 192.168.0.1. Other computers on the 192.168.1 network have a routing table like this:
Code: Select all
Kernel IP routing table
Destination     Gateway         Genmask         Flags Metric Ref    Use Iface
192.168.1.0     *               255.255.255.0   U     0      0      0   eth0
192.168.0.0     192.168.1.2     255.255.255.0   U     0      0      0   eth0
loopback        *               255.0.0.0       U     0      0      0   lo
default         192.168.0.1     0.0.0.0         UG    0      0      0   eth0

And, of course, I logged into 192.168.0.1 and added a route to 192.168.1.0 with the netmask 255.255.255.0 and gateway 192.168.0.2.

Now, computers on both networks can ping eachother fine, and services like SSH work well too, but computers in the 192.168.1 network can't get on the Internet. They can ping the router, and look up DNS names correctly, but always time out when trying to communicate with an external IP. I tried changing the gateway of the default route to 192.168.1.2, with no success. So, am I doing something wrong here? Or is it possible that my router just doesn't want to do masquerading for anyone not in the same subnet?

Thanks in advance for any help.

-- Wed Feb 02, 2011 4:13 pm --

Well, after wasting hours of my life talking to tech support (who tried to convince me that the router "does not modify any data being sent over the network"), I finally got a straight answer.

According to this douche I talked to, my router (an Axesstel MV400) will not route any packets for any computers that it reaches through a "user defined" static route. Sucks.

Thanks anyways, everyone.
"Well it isn't my fault. I shouldn't have been allowed to do something to crash it." "No, you shouldn't have been allowed to buy a computer in the first place"
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Re: Possible gateway problem

Post by RevengeDriven on Sun Mar 27, 2011 3:03 pm
([msg=55616]see Re: Possible gateway problem[/msg])

How do you have the two routers connected? By ethernet? You should be able to link the two networks together without problem if they are connected by ethernet. If you are trying to connect the two routers wirelessly that may propose a problem. Check this site if you connecting them wirelessly:
Code: Select all
http://bc.whirlpool.net.au/bc/hardware/
it will tell you the features of the router as in if it offers wireless bridging, WDS, access point mode or client mode and so on.

If you are connecting them together by way of ethernet make sure to put them in the same subnet. So either use 192.168.0.0 and 192.168.0.1 for the gateways or 192.168.1.0 and 192.168.1.1 for the gateways. Also make sure to have only one router handing out DHCP clients. Usually you want that to be the upstream router (closest to the modem). Put them both on the same channel and use the same SSID (if connecting wirelessly). I'd than run static i.p.s on the LAN with i.p.'s that are well out of the DHCP range that is being handed out. If you enable MAC filtering be sure to put all MAC'S from one network into one router (including the router MAC) and do the same for the other.
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Re: Possible gateway problem

Post by Phantom Wolf on Mon Mar 28, 2011 7:36 am
([msg=55636]see Re: Possible gateway problem[/msg])

I'm actually using a laptop to act as a gateway between the networks. Communication between those two networks was working flawlessly, the only problem was access to Internet resources. I fixed this by setting up NAT on the laptop and configuring it to ignore any 192.168.0.0/24 addresses. That allowed me to retain communication between networks while allowing devices on the 192.168.1.0/24 network to access the Internet

Thanks for the information, though.
"Well it isn't my fault. I shouldn't have been allowed to do something to crash it." "No, you shouldn't have been allowed to buy a computer in the first place"
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